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Relative harmony, experience, and digtal tools in networked learning

Below is the eleven minute audio teaser and supplementary component for a symposium I am participating in at the 13th International Conference on Networked Learning (NLC2022), entitled, Phenomenology and networked learning – a found chord. One of the symposium organizers, Mike Johnson, has introduced the audio segment to the symposium beautifully here. The paper I am presenting is entitled, “Re-presencing the digital trace in networked learning design”.

This updated audio file reflects on what “a found chord” means to my presentation. As Christopher Alexander inspired how I set out networked learning design in my paper, I thought it would be fitting in this recording to follow a quotation by him, taken from his first volume in The Nature of Order series. In this quotation, he mentions “relative harmony”:
As architects, builders, and artists, we are called upon constantly—every moment of the working day—to make judgments about relative harmony. We are constantly trying to make decisions about what is better and what is worse…
What does “relative harmony” mean with respect to our experience of learning about the ever-more digital world and the spatialization of the connection between us and the digital tools we choose to use? From the audio file introduction:
[As Alexander wrote,] ‘We are constantly trying to make decisions about what is better and what is worse. . . ’ To better understand this recording, try to visualize the network in networked learning as ’focus[ing] on node-link structures, foregrounding connectivity . . . and backgrounding such things as spatial relations’ (Goodyear et al. 2016). In this talk, spatial relations refer to the space between ourselves and other people and things around us and the trajectory we engage in to try to understand these others in our learning experience. The purpose of the recording is to reflect on the question of How we can conscientiously assemble technical things, people, activities, and outcomes in networked learning such that we do not deny the world of feeling and experience – which is expressed in time and space – nor deny the world of objects (cf. Goodyear et al. 2016, Whitehead [1929] 1978).

The audio recording is divided into four sections: Where are we?, When is technology?, Vector Feeling, and Where are we going?

Right click the .mp3 file below to download.



Audio clip



The transcript can be downloaded below:
Relative harmony, experience, and digtal tools in networked learning (Audio transcript PDF)

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